Historical Sketch. Professors and Alumni of the Medical Department of the University of Louisiana. Stanford E. Chaille.
Historical Sketch. Professors and Alumni of the Medical Department of the University of Louisiana.
Historical Sketch. Professors and Alumni of the Medical Department of the University of Louisiana.
Historical Sketch. Professors and Alumni of the Medical Department of the University of Louisiana.
Historical Sketch. Professors and Alumni of the Medical Department of the University of Louisiana.
Historical Sketch. Professors and Alumni of the Medical Department of the University of Louisiana.
Historical Sketch. Professors and Alumni of the Medical Department of the University of Louisiana.
Historical Sketch. Professors and Alumni of the Medical Department of the University of Louisiana.
Historical Sketch. Professors and Alumni of the Medical Department of the University of Louisiana.

Historical Sketch. Professors and Alumni of the Medical Department of the University of Louisiana.

New Orleans Louisiana: Printed at the Bulletin Book and Job Office, 1861. First Edition. Soft Cover. Very Good. Item #26833

18 pages; the first page inscribed at top edge, "From Dr. J.L. Riddell April 8th 1863" With information on the history of the University and the faculty; the Chair of Chemistry is noted as Dr. John L. Ridell at the time of printing. Contents with a "schedule" that "...will enable the curious to observe, at a glance, who were the members of the Faculty for any year since the Foundation of the College." With lists of the alumni beginning with graduates of 1836 and ending with 1861, inclusive. Stanford Emerson Chaillé (1830-1911) physician, medical educator, and sanitarian, was born in Natchez, Mississippi and "...became a demonstrator in anatomy at the University of Louisiana medical school in 1858, beginning an association with the school that would end only with his retirement in 1908. Chaillé was in Europe when the Civil War broke out, and he hurried home to join a Louisiana troop as a private. His superior officers quickly recognized that he was of greater value as a physician and appointed him surgeon general of the Louisiana troops. He then moved to the staff of General Braxton Bragg and later to administer hospitals in Atlanta and Macon, where he was captured in 1865. Chaillé returned to New Orleans and helped his colleagues resurrect the medical school… In 1886 he became dean of the medical school, which was renamed Tulane University...(his) greatest contribution to medicine was as an educator and reformer. Under his guidance Tulane gained a place in the forefront of American medical school...an important voice for raising the standards of excellence in medical education and public health practice in New Orleans for more than fifty years...." (Margaret Humphreys in the ANB) John Leonard Riddell (1807-1865) American botanist, microscopist and geologist, inventor, "...in 1836 Riddell accepted the professorship of chemistry in the newly organized Medical College of Louisiana in New Orleans, where he would remain for the rest of his life...In New Orleans, Riddell continued his research in geology, botany, and chemistry and, in addition, experimented in physiology and microscopy...Not content with his scientific research, he dabbled in many areas, ranging from making cement to constructing musical instruments. As early as 1830-1831 he drew plans for a typewriter. While in New Orleans he analyzed the well water, theorized about atoms and matter, and became interested in the mechanics of microscopes. In 1851 he devised a binocular microscope, using four glass prisms to divide the light from a single object. He ground and polished the lens himself and demonstrated the principle before the New Orleans Physico-Medical Society in 1852 and the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1853… On a personal level he was described as eccentric, outspoken, pompous, and cynical, but despite these qualities he was quite active in public and political life. ...Although Riddell wrote many articles and was knowledgeable in a wide range of subjects, his chief contribution was to promote an interest in science at a time when few Americans were concerned with what they considered abstruse knowledge. His most original work lay in the fields of botany, microscopy, and geology. (John Duffy, describing a very this very inventive & active life in the ANB) This pamphlet is a separate offprint, printed from the May No. of "The New Orleans Medical and Surgical Journal." Approx. 5 3/4" x 9" size; original printed light gray-green sewn paper wrap covers; light wear, old crease-line; some spotting and foxing; in very good condition.

Price: $650.00

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