Circa 1953 - 1957 Collection of Letters, Documents, Photographs, Yearbooks and Ephemeral Materials of a Poughkeepsie, NY American U.S. Army Serviceman Stationed in Germany During the Cold War. Americana - Manuscript - 20th Century - United States Army - Germany.
Circa 1953 - 1957 Collection of Letters, Documents, Photographs, Yearbooks and Ephemeral Materials of a Poughkeepsie, NY American U.S. Army Serviceman Stationed in Germany During the Cold War.
Circa 1953 - 1957 Collection of Letters, Documents, Photographs, Yearbooks and Ephemeral Materials of a Poughkeepsie, NY American U.S. Army Serviceman Stationed in Germany During the Cold War.
Circa 1953 - 1957 Collection of Letters, Documents, Photographs, Yearbooks and Ephemeral Materials of a Poughkeepsie, NY American U.S. Army Serviceman Stationed in Germany During the Cold War.
Circa 1953 - 1957 Collection of Letters, Documents, Photographs, Yearbooks and Ephemeral Materials of a Poughkeepsie, NY American U.S. Army Serviceman Stationed in Germany During the Cold War.
Circa 1953 - 1957 Collection of Letters, Documents, Photographs, Yearbooks and Ephemeral Materials of a Poughkeepsie, NY American U.S. Army Serviceman Stationed in Germany During the Cold War.
Circa 1953 - 1957 Collection of Letters, Documents, Photographs, Yearbooks and Ephemeral Materials of a Poughkeepsie, NY American U.S. Army Serviceman Stationed in Germany During the Cold War.
Circa 1953 - 1957 Collection of Letters, Documents, Photographs, Yearbooks and Ephemeral Materials of a Poughkeepsie, NY American U.S. Army Serviceman Stationed in Germany During the Cold War.
Circa 1953 - 1957 Collection of Letters, Documents, Photographs, Yearbooks and Ephemeral Materials of a Poughkeepsie, NY American U.S. Army Serviceman Stationed in Germany During the Cold War.
Circa 1953 - 1957 Collection of Letters, Documents, Photographs, Yearbooks and Ephemeral Materials of a Poughkeepsie, NY American U.S. Army Serviceman Stationed in Germany During the Cold War.
Circa 1953 - 1957 Collection of Letters, Documents, Photographs, Yearbooks and Ephemeral Materials of a Poughkeepsie, NY American U.S. Army Serviceman Stationed in Germany During the Cold War.

Circa 1953 - 1957 Collection of Letters, Documents, Photographs, Yearbooks and Ephemeral Materials of a Poughkeepsie, NY American U.S. Army Serviceman Stationed in Germany During the Cold War.

Poughkeepsie New York: Not Published, 1953. F. About 115 letters, most of them having their mailing envelopes with postal cancellations, from Cameron S. Reynolds of Poughkeepsie, New York, sent to his parents, with a few letters to his sister Beverly; with photographs, ephemera & documents listed below. The letters average 2-3 pages each in the beginning and often go on for 5-6 pages, are closely written very detailed and expressively full of information, mostly while stationed in a U.S. Army depot in Germany. Camp events, travel and tourism, work & training, concerns for future postings and rank advancement, and concern for family, friends and news from home are constant themes. A writing quirk is that he self-margins about an inch on each side of his writing, centering the letters in the page. In 1953 Cameron S. Reynolds started his military career in training at Ft. Dix, NJ; he is 26 years old on enlistment. His father was the owner of S.J. Reynolds Desoto-Plymouth sales & service 633 Main St. Poughkeepsie, NY.; the family also have a working farm. Letter-writing begins in earnest in January of 1954; he has been sent to the Atlanta "reception area" until being shipped to an undetermined overseas locale. He hoped for transfer to a finance training position which didn't come through, for which he is ultimately grateful, since his research indicated that "…finance is quite boring…". Instead, he goes to transportation mechanic school, most probably because he'd had experience in the family business. He also takes advantage of the business courses available through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute, so that "…with this combination of training I will amount to something when I get out. It may all be working out for the best and I intend to get all I can while I am here…They are very careful here about health and clean living conditions. They give you every opportunity to make good in school and iron out complaints or give help in any way possible…" He is pleased that he can entertain himself, cheaply - "…on weekends & stay in town and have a good time for about $ 8.00" In an early 1954 letter, he is pleased that "…pop finally got into the Connecticut milk market and will be glad to see the production system now in effect…" and in the same note, with some financial insight, "…I think you were foolish not to take advantage of the rake off the Galligans could have given you on the paper. They owe pop that much and they make the same amount any way. I will be glad to see how the job turns out…" Included are (2) Parks Dept. City of Atlanta illustrated flyers about the panorama painting of the Battle of Atlanta housed at the Cyclorama Building in Grant Park: "…Grant Park is a beautiful park with a lake, boats to rent, picnic areas and lovely grounds and buildings…The canvas is hung on a circular rod and that is its only support. It is done so perfectly that you can not see a fold or a wrinkle…good perspective to the scale. The narration leads you around the whole scene describing the battle of Atlanta beginning to end…" "…I am learning enough about all Army vehicles to repair any part of any wheel vehicle made for the Army…it is a good course and only hope that I get a good job out of it…" All is going tolerably well; still, in the Atlanta camp, March 24, 1954: "…We had a big time here last night as we nearly had a good old riot. There is a no good damn Sergeant that is in charge of the barracks now and he loves to be a heller. We were out of patience and decided to clean house when he came. There were eighty of us and only a few of them; he did not show up…They decided not to tangle with us and respect us since they know how far we can be pushed….A few eight balls were getting drunk and waking us up all the time so we straightened them up. They have been as quiet as mice since then and I don't think we shall be troubled again. A few dirty slobs…in the shower, then they decided to tackle some of us for fun. I made it very plain that no man had better lay a hand on me which changed their minds quickly…We all get along fine and no one touches any one else's belongings which is very good…" Finally he gets his posting in May of 1954, shipping out of Staten Island on the USS Goethals; two letters are posted while enroute; one of which notes the sadness of the passing of his wife Roberta, which appears to have happened some years before: "…We would have been married five years yesterday and might have had a sizable family by now if things had been different…" An earlier note mentioned that a family friend had died of the same disease as Roberta, with no other details; this is a sensitive, not-often-mentioned subject. His final posting is to Crailsheim, at a U.S. Army ordnance depot outside Stuttgart. He is impressed by the cleanliness and newness of the barracks and the abundance of good food & plentiful milk. Nearly as soon as he arrives, his wallet is stolen in the barracks and he needs replacement paperwork. He is "…attached to the Seventh Army as a direct support outfit, ready at all times to move into action if necessary as our unit is all mobile. We support a great many units with weapons and vehicles but I am not at liberty to tell you any more than that…we are well armed and keep our equipment in good repair…" And remarking on the U.S. Army's usefulness in Germany, "…You have no doubt heard about the floods east of here near Bavaria, due to the heavy snows…The army is helping to control the floods and should win favor with the population…" His father is involved with Chrysler auto sales & repairs and son Cameron is always paying attention to industry news - new models, strikes, competition and anything that he thinks may help his father's business. He brought his personal automobile, keeps it in top condition even if requiring hard-to-find parts be sent from the U.S. and "…must work because I hold a key job and must get parts for all the units even additional ones here on manoeuvers…" In August of 1954, "…I am being investigated by the Army for some special work so do not be alarmed if the FBI visits you.." And later, "…that secret work that I am being investigated for is nothing to get excited about, purely routine. I will leave here in the near future on TDY (Temporary Duty Orders) to go to a school for a short time. If you do not hear from me for a while you will know that I am alright. Do not say anything about this as it would be best not to and I do not know much more. I do not know why I am picked for this kind of stuff…I had to give my life history and some of yours…This security check is a regular check made by the Army for certain types of work. I have a chance to better myself with this new job if I can make the grade and will try very hard to do my job well. It is mostly a character check to make sure that I have no record and that I have always been a good American citizen….they will find that I meet these qualifications as I have nothing to hide. I do hope that you fully understand the reasons for not telling you more..." And "…I am applying for a job in the Counter Intelligence Corps, as I have all the qualifications…" He gets the job and then quickly, has "…been turned down by my own wish as they wanted me to re-enlist and I flatly refused…" Frankfurt & Heidelberg are toured, often using his auto as a 'hotel' for the army buddies on leave; he formed a friendship lasting his tour with a German family that welcomes and feeds him and friends abundantly with great appreciation of their American visitors; he describes these visits in detail. October of 1954, trip to Switzerland, France, Italy & Spain; he took the DeSoto, with 3 other Army friends, "…a total of fifteen days and approximately four thousand miles…" Manoeuvers can be dangerous: "…We had memorial services today for a colored boy killed in a jeep accident from our company. This occurred during the West Wind manoeuvers last month…a total of about four men were killed and many injured. Some men from a tank outfit had an accident when a tank and retriever went over a bank…" November, 1954: "…The main excitement here now is the road bandits which prey on motorists along the autobahn…they are now using police uniforms. Knowing that people will not try to run through a road block they are doing very well up to now…" "…The butter here in Germany is far superior to that we have at home, for my taste and I seldom do without it. The difference so far as I can find out is that it has no salt in it at all. It is light, creamy, and smooth as well as delightful. I think that when I get home I shall find some company that makes it like that…Thanksgiving we entertained a group of DP children, near here that have nothing…we have all chipped in to give them a good Christmas also and have a lot of toys as well as clothing. I think there are about thirty of them of all sizes and ages but very poor…" A 1954 note from a friend on 11th Airborne illustrated letter paper, remembered Reynolds fondly "…you were the most level headed guy in the whole gang, and we had great respect for you, and I am sure none of this has changed…" In a letter from Oct. 3, 1954 he includes cloth swatches of which he's had a sports jacket and slacks made by a local tailor. 1955, a feeling of Cold War tension: "…We have been keeping posted on the Formosa situation but do not think anything will happen yet. There has been another shakeup in the Kremlin, they may destroy each other if given enough time…" His sister comes to Germany on a tour in 1956 and he takes her sightseeing, to Hitler's retreat at Berchtesgaden and to Dachau concentration camp. He gets promoted to Corporal rank and later, specialist rankings. He never considers the military as a career, even when offered tempting reasons to re-enlist - raises in rank, postings, or better jobs; mostly he is anxious to get out and go home. His service ends in November of 1956, with rank of SP3 in the 6th Ordnance Co. 71st Ordnance Battalion. (with) Circa 30 pieces of ephemeral paper: delivery authorizations, private shipping documents, importing certificates, sales slips and licensing papers, insurance riders, vehicle registrations and duty rail tickets, along with redeployment notices; all part of Reynold's purchase of a 1956 Austin Healey 2-seater in England, bringing it to Germany where he used it and finally to the U.S. (with) About 100 black and white snapshots, mostly of locations in Germany: Ulm, Swabish, Rothenburg & a few other locales; a few from England, Warwick. Average about 3 ½" x 4 ½" size, most are identified as to locale and some with other remarks. There are also a group of a dozen Ektachrome color slides of a Florida trip in the early 1960s; identified and studio portrait photographs, approx. 5" x 7" mostly of Reynolds as a child and one of him in uniform with his army friends. (with) A Baby's Own Book designed by Farini, pub. 1924 by Richard G. Krueger NY; with information about his Reynold's birth including photographs of his mother & baby shots, chronological entries to age about 15, small biographical anecdotes. (with) The Pine Log published by the Senior Class of Pine Plains Central School 1945 & the issue for 1946, Reynold's graduation year; with his graduation diploma. Also included here are the yearbook for 1954 Anchors Arlington H.S. Poughkeepsie, NY for Dianna Wright and the Cornellian (Cornell University) yearbook for 1947; Reynolds is noted as on the wrestling team on p. 286 (note on title page). A Tuck's Souvenir "Letterview" of Loughborough; a 2-sided business card for Matleigh House Hyde Park London; an Amsterdam brochure; a single ticket London-Ostend and an illustrated menu for the Gasthof Engel Murrhardt, R. und G. Bunk Kuchenchef. Some soiling and wear; in very good condition; an archive telling the story of a U.S. Army enlisted during the Cold War in Germany. Item #26430

Price: $350.00