Circa 1890 Autograph of English Author & Journalist Henrietta Eliza Vaughan Stannard [née Palmer] Using Pseudonyms Violet Whyte and (here) John Strange Winter (1856 - 1911). Great Britain - Literature - Autograph - Henrietta Eliza Vaughan Stannard.
Circa 1890 Autograph of English Author & Journalist Henrietta Eliza Vaughan Stannard [née Palmer] Using Pseudonyms Violet Whyte and (here) John Strange Winter (1856 - 1911)

Circa 1890 Autograph of English Author & Journalist Henrietta Eliza Vaughan Stannard [née Palmer] Using Pseudonyms Violet Whyte and (here) John Strange Winter (1856 - 1911)

England, UK: Not Published, 1890. Autograph. Not Bound. Very Good. Item #027709

Autograph, "Very Truly yours John Strange Winter" (1856 - 1911) British author & journalist Henrietta Eliza Vaughan Stannard [née Palmer] Using Pseudonyms Violet Whyte and (here) John Strange Winter (1856 - 1911), "...At fourteen, under the pseudonym of Violet Whyte, she began a ten-year period writing short stories for magazines, including London Society and Family Herald. She later started to publish novels, though she was persuaded, given their subject matter, to issue these under a male pseudonym, John Strange Winter. Her reputation as a novelist on military life was first recognized with the publication of Cavalry Life (1881) and Regimental Legends (1883); it became firmly established thereafter through her best-selling title, Bootles' Baby: a Story of the Scarlet Lancers (1885), which sold two million copies and was also successfully adapted for the stage. Her intimate knowledge of army matters, combined with a sprightly yet simplistic style, led to John Ruskin's declaring Stannard 'the author to whom we owe the most finished and faithful rendering ever yet given of the character of the British soldier' (Daily Telegraph, 17 Jan 1888). Winter was the name of one of her fictional characters in the 1881 novel, but even after disclosing her identity, Stannard retained the pseudonym for the rest of her professional career....In 1891 she started an illustrated, penny weekly magazine for women called Golden Gates, later retitled Winter's Weekly, which continued until 1895; it was one of the first periodicals of its kind to be exclusively owned, edited, and published by a popular novelist. The paper's content appealed to a growing number of professional married women in paid employment, for whom the domestic sphere was still important, but no longer perceived to be their only acceptable domain. Her concern for the rights of professional women writers and journalists was reflected in an active membership of the Society of Authors (1888), election as fellow of the Royal Society of Literature (1893), and presidencies of the all-women's Writers' Club (1892) and Society of Women Journalists (1901 - 03)....." (Owen R. Ashton in the ODNB) Approx. 2 5/8" x 5" size. Light wear; old fold line; album mount paper on back; in very good condition.

Price: $65.00